Your Prenatal Dental Checklist

“Have a baby, lose a tooth" is an expression that most dentists have heard, but few pregnant moms know about.

Dental hygiene is more important than ever when you are pregnant, because bacteria in your teeth and gums can also harm your unborn baby.

Dr. Panahpour's take:

Dental hygiene is more important than ever when you are pregnant, because bacteria in your teeth and gums can also harm your unborn baby.

For this reason, Dr. Panahpour recommends light dental hygiene cleanings every 3 months during pregnancy. He recommends avoiding deep dental cleanings, unless your ND or MD decides that the severity of your dental infection outweighs the risks of a deep cleaning to your unborn child.

Hormonal changes during pregnancy cause gums to become inflamed, tender, bright red, to bleed easily and to catch more food between the teeth, leading to gum disease and tooth decay that a woman may not normally have experienced prior to becoming pregnant. 

Dr. Panahpour recommends taking care of any dental work, including deep cleaning, treatment of a cavity, tooth extraction, dental implant or other alternatives to a root canal prior to getting pregnant. Deep dental work spreads bacteria that causes dental decay and infection throughout the mother's body. Everything introduced into the mother's body will also affect her unborn child.

 Hormonal changes during pregnancy cause gums to become inflamed, tender, bright red, to bleed easily and to catch more food between the teeth, leading to gum disease and tooth decay that a woman may not normally have experienced prior to becoming pregnant. 

Hormonal changes during pregnancy cause gums to become inflamed, tender, bright red, to bleed easily and to catch more food between the teeth, leading to gum disease and tooth decay that a woman may not normally have experienced prior to becoming pregnant. 

The mommyblog Romper has published a story quoting Dr. Panahpour on the dangers of getting deep cleaning while you are pregnant, and his recommendations for prenatal oral health.  Other non-holistic and non-biological dentists are quoted as well, which highlights the differences between the care provided by general dentists vs. a biological dentist who takes into consideration the health of the entire body. 

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"Everything introduced into the mother's body will also affect her unborn child, including the bacteria found in biofilm that causes dental decay and infection."

--Dr. Alireza Panahpour

 

 

Published by Romper:

"And to that end, some experts disagree that it’s 100 percent safe because of said bacteria — like Dr. Alireza Panahpour, a systemic, biological and holistic dentist and author of "The Good Dentist."
Dr. Panahpour tells Romper, "Deep cleaning involves removing biofilm on teeth -- and that is not recommended for pregnant women unless their medical doctor or naturopath recommends it for the health of the mother."
Panahpour says it's because the deep cleaning will spread this biofilm into the rest of her body, "including the unborn child. Everything introduced into the mother's body will also affect her unborn child, including the bacteria found in biofilm that causes dental decay and infection. It is for this same reason that other dental procedures are not recommended during pregnancy, if possible."
He suggests clearing any dental procedures with your OB-GYN first."
 

It  may be of interest to anyone interested in dentistry during pregnancy that 28 countries have recently voted to ban dental mercury amalgam for pregnant and nursing mothers, as well as for children under the age of 15. This ban of dental mercury amalgam goes into effect July 1, 2018. Although using mercury in dentistry is still legal in the United States and in Canada, you may want to learn more about why other countries have chosen to ban mercury dental amalgam for these vulnerable communities as part of your prenatal checklist. 

What will YOU do to prepare your body prior to becoming pregnant? Share your tips in comments and share this article with friends who may want to add "dental cleaning" to their prenatal checklist.